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Crime Scene Sketching

Use a measurement table  for the evidence in your sketch. The table is adaptable to any coordinate system  (triangulation, rectangular, baseline or even radial). The table may help in  reminding you to measure the heighth, which is frequently overlooked.  Eliminating needless measurement lines will rid confusion by making your sketch  look cleaner.

Item #

Description

R1-North wall

R-2 West wall

Ht.

Other

1

Lead 38 cal bullet

1’ 2”

11’ 3”

3’ 2”

To #2 = 5’ 8”

2

Ruger, Security Six, Stainless, SN123456, 5 live, 1 spent

6’ 4”

5’ 11”

1’ 8”

 

3

Cold, ½ full “Smittys”beer can, D23Oz65 on bottom

7’ 9”

9’ 8”

0

 

4

Blood stain on floor

3’ 6”

7’ 7”

0

 

5

Box of WW 38 SPL lead bullets minus 6, brass cases

4’ 10”

6’ 3”

1’ 8”

 

6

4” fixed blade knife, wood handle

6’ 9”

14’ 4”

0

 

7

Blood spot

6’ 2”

4’ 5”

0

 

8

Handwritten note signed “Jake”

17’ 3”

3’ 1”

2’ 6”

 

Instead of  the walls you can use corners for triangulation. You are not limited to two  reference points. Note the above "relationship" measurements. These measurements cannot accurately be made on a "scale" drawing at a later time.  Always think of the height of the objects!  NOTE the trick of using the same orientation of a wall or a corner even though the room changes and the specific wall does too!  (Isn’t it obvious that the North wall in the bathroom is a different one than used in the bedroom?  Incidently... this sketch was drawn in 5 minutes with a program costing less than 40$. Try 3D Home Architect by Broderbund as an introduction to sketching... it is worth it!